Pay Attention To Your Seafood Safety

27 Jun

Seafood is so necessary in our lives, it is so nutritive, if you’re like most health-conscious people, you’re probably eating more fish every day. But you may also be getting something in your seafood that’s not so welcome, contaminants. So seafood safety always causes the top attention all over the world.

Though seafood violations varied depending on the different inspection systems used across countries, the Hopkins researchers found that shrimp and prawns, overall, exceeded drug residue limits most frequently. Other problematic imported seafood included crab, basa (a type of catfish), eel, and tilapia, most or all likely farmed. Of all countries, Vietnam had the most drug violations, followed by China and then other countries in Asia, including Thailand, Indonesia, Taiwan, India, and Malaysia.

Seafood

Antibiotics, antifungals, and antiparasitics, as well as pesticides and disinfectants, are often used in fish farming to control diseases that can spread rampantly in crowded conditions. While routine exposure to such substances can pose a risk to aquaculture workers, the health effects of chronic low-level exposure in fish eaters are not fully known. At the very least, widespread use of antibiotics in aquaculture can contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and cause important antibiotic drugs to become ineffective in people.

Contaminants in seafood are not limited to just farmed fish from developing countries. For example, as reported in a well-publicized study in Science in 2004, farmed salmon from Europe had the most PCBs and other potentially harmful industrial pollutants, while Chilean farmed salmon had less, which shows that problems in aquaculture occur in the developed world, too. (Changes in feeding practices in recent years may be reducing that problem.) And larger wild-caught fish, such as swordfish, have high levels of mercury, which can impair the nervous systems of developing fetuses, infants, and young children.

If you are care about your seafood safety very much, you need to vary your seafood choices to minimize overexposing yourself to any particular contaminants they may contain. It’s okay to eat some farmed salmon, but perhaps not every week. Wild salmon is always a good option—and most canned salmon is wild (and cheap).

Buy from a local fishmonger who has been in business for a while, buys direct from distributors, and can answer specific questions about the fish. Despite the good intentions of the COOL regulations, there is little oversight, so going to a trusted source is a better bet for getting high-quality fish.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: