Recipe for scones with green kiwi fruit jam

20 Dec

1499
The humble kiwi fruit occupies an unfairly neglected position in the minds of most home cooks. Before a 20th-century rebranding by savvy New Zealand farmers, it was known as the Chinese gooseberry, but beyond the tartness of flavour and the acid-green flesh, the comparison to gooseberries might seem a bit far-fetched. Once cooked down into a jam, however, the taste is uncannily familiar. Perfect for a batch of scones fresh from the oven.

This is one of the easiest jams I’ve ever made. I’d usually rely on my trusty kitchen thermometer to reassure me that it has reached the correct temperature to set properly, but that’s currently out of action, so I had to rely on more traditional methods instead. The combination of fruits are so full of pectin (responsible for the jelly-ish consistency of jam) that it’s virtually impossible to undercook. Your efforts will be rewarded with a deliciously tart jam, speckled attractively with little black seeds.

Afternoon scones with green jam
For the green jam
Prep 10 min
Cook 10 min
Makes 1 jar

6 kiwis
2 granny smith apples, peeled, cored and grated
Juice of 2 limes
250g caster or granulated sugar

For the scones
Prep 10 min
Cook 12 min
Makes 10 scones

200g plain flour
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
40g caster sugar
60g cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
100g natural yoghurt
50g dried currants
1 egg, to glaze (optional)

Peel the kiwis, trim the ends, then quarter lengthways. Remove the white inner flesh along the spine of each quarter and put the fruit in a saucepan.

Add the grated apple, lime juice and sugar, and cook on a medium heat, giving it a brief stir every now and then, so the sugar is evenly distributed. Leave to bubble away for a couple of minutes, then use a potato masher to break up the fruit.

Cook the jam for another five minutes or so. Knowing when it’s done is more a question of consistency than exact timings: once properly cooked, it should have lost most of its water and traded its initial vivid green for a more muted tone. If it has started to brown slightly, it’s just starting to pass the perfect set point, so take off the heat immediately and pour into a sterilised jar. (Or use the cold plate test: spoon a little of the mix on to to to a plate – it should cool rapidly, and allow you to assess the texture; you’re aiming for something thickened and spreadable.)

For the scones, preheat the oven to 200C/390F/gas mark 6. Sieve the flour, salt, bicarb and sugar into a bowl, then add the butter and rub in until there are no big lumps left.

Spoon in the yoghurt. Cut it through the mix with a blunt dinner knife: the aim is to disperse it evenly without doing any heavy-handed overmixing of the dough (to avoid lumpy, tough scones). Scatter in the currants, then give the mix a very brief knead to form it into a dough.

Lightly flour a worktop and a rolling pin. Roll out the dough into a 2.5cm-thick disc. Use a 5cm round cookie cutter to cCut out the scones and lay these on a baking sheet lined with greaseproof paper. Gather the offcuts, roll out and cut again until all the dough has been used up.

Lightly brush the tops of the scones with beaten egg (if using), then bake for 12 minutes, until the tops are a rich, nutty brown.

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